Who We Are

Holy Trinity is vibrant, progressive, and diverse. Many were raised Lutheran but lots of others were Roman Catholics, other Protestants, or sometimes nothing at all. More than half are in their 20s and 30s, reflecting our neighborhood. We have a number of people who come to church alone, either because they are single or their partner/spouse does not attend. There are many families with young children. In fact, there are more than 70 children under ten, including many infants. The LBGTQI+ community is well-represented and there are a number of same-gender couples, some with children. Some members have seminary degrees and others are new to the faith. Holy Trinity has a strong connection with the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and each year we have one or more seminarians as part of the ministry team.

Our theology reflects the Lutheran emphasis on grace, and the need for continuing reformation of the Church as it seeks ways to speak the gospel powerfully to contemporary culture. We value spiritual insights from Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Native Americans and others as we together work for peace and justice in the world.

You may have had a bad experience with church or religion when growing up. We welcome skeptics and those who struggle with faith or organized religion. It can be hard to move beyond childhood religion to one that makes sense in today’s world. Wherever you are in your spiritual life you are welcome at Holy Trinity.

We believe that we are called to live our faith in the world as we work for justice and seek the good of all. Through ONE Northside we address issues such as affordable housing, hate crimes, mental health, youth homelessness and access to health care. We have worked with Refugee One to sponsor refugee families. We volunteer at the Lakeview Pantry, the Night Ministry, the Crib Shelter for homeless youth, and the feeding program of South Loop Campus Ministry. We give approximately ten percent of our offerings to support local ministries in Chicago, world hunger and other ministries of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

What We Value

Our worship is ancient and new.

We celebrate a multi-sensory liturgy based on ancient patterns and rituals that go back to the early centuries of Christianity. We gather each Sunday to hear the scriptures and wrestle with their meaning for our lives today. We share the sacred meal of bread and wine and depart to serve a world in need. Though ancient, worship is always fresh and new as the gospel of Christ comes alive for our contemporary context. Time unplugged from electronic devices allows reflection and centering. Open to the Mystery we connect, strengthen and serve with joy.

Things We’re For

Radical inclusivity regardless of race, ethnicity, gender identity, documentation or socio-economic status, sexual orientation or religious/spiritual background. Welcoming refugees and immigrants as the biblical injunction to provide hospitality to strangers. Democracy as the means  to support those who are marginalized or most vulnerable in society. Embodied gathering in real time and sacred space. Multisensory liturgy that helps us delight in God’s beauty. Intentional engagement with contemporary social, theological and spiritual issues. God’s creation, including human beings, that are wonderfully diverse. User-friendly liturgies. Preaching that is honest about the struggles of life and the grace of God. Robust congregational singing. Reverence and joy in worship that spills over into everyday life. Cultivating empowering relationships, not only at church but everywhere. Openness to questions and faith struggles.Treasuring mystery above certainty.

Things We’re Against

Power and privilege that lead to prejudice and oppression. Systems that perpetuate white preference and advantage. Binary ways of looking at gender, sexuality, and other ways of being in the world. Political ideologies that pit love of country against service to the earth and all its people. Patriarchy and sexism that discriminate against women and gender non-conforming people. Senseless violence. Negative and hateful partisanship. Superficial responses to life’s painful and difficult realities. Boring sermons. Church services that don’t connect with everyday life. Equating Christianity with a particular political party. Indifference to injustice and suffering. Misuse of the earth and its resources.